On average, how much do modern day pirates make when they rob a ship?

111219-N-ZZ999-076 GULF OF ADEN (Dec. 19, 2011) - A visit, board, search and seizure team from the guided-missile destroyer USS Pinckney (DDG 91) approaches a suspected pirate vessel after the Motor Vessel Nordic Apollo reported being under attack and fired upon by pirates. Pinckney is assigned to Combined Task Force 151, a multinational, mission-based task force working under Combined Maritime Forces to conduct counter-piracy operations in the Southern Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, Somali Basin, Arabian Sea, and Indian Ocean. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

111219-N-ZZ999-076 GULF OF ADEN (Dec. 19, 2011) - A visit, board, search and seizure team from the guided-missile destroyer USS Pinckney (DDG 91) approaches a suspected pirate vessel after the Motor Vessel Nordic Apollo reported being under attack and fired upon by pirates. Pinckney is assigned to Combined Task Force 151, a multinational, mission-based task force working under Combined Maritime Forces to conduct counter-piracy operations in the Southern Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, Somali Basin, Arabian Sea, and Indian Ocean. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

Answer: $2.7 million

Mic - The Economist reports that the average haul for a ship is $2.7 million, with each pirate receiving between $30,000 to $75,000. This adds up to hundreds of millions in dollars in ransom over the past decade. However, ships have become more alert to this threat and have increased their security. In the first six months of 2012, there were only 70 attacks on ships by Somali pirates, compared to 163 during the same time the year before. Thus, while piracy has been particularly profitable the past couple of years, whether it will be in the future is unclear.

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